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A New Tradition: Prime Rib for Thanksgiving

Celebratory and holiday traditions are generally great to have. Holiday traditions bring family and friends together, sometimes for the first time they’ve seen each other in months or even years. And while that’s the most important feature of those traditions, there’s more to them than the guest list. Turkey at Thanksgiving, for instance. Turkey tastes really good, which doesn’t hurt, but it’s at least as much about the ritual of carving and the expectation of and nostalgia for a turkey feast as it is about the feast itself.


 

All that being said, and acknowledging how great traditions tend to be, who says that you have to celebrate other peoples’ traditions? While the comfortable familiarity and predictability of them is a big part of their charm, the great thing about traditions is that you can make your own. And when you do, there’s a good chance you’ll find them even more fun, special, and important than the ones you inherited. That, and the fact that some people just like the taste of rich, tender, dry-aged beef more than they do turkey, are great reasons to make your own Thanksgiving tradition this year by serving prime rib instead of poultry.

Why Prime Rib?

First and foremost, when prepared, cooked, seasoned with salt and pepper, and served properly, there’s almost nothing that tastes as good as prime rib. That seasoned-sear crust surrounding one of the most delicious cuts of pink, succulent, velvety beef available, finished with its au jus… it’s incomparable.

Prime rib also lends itself to the existing template for the Thanksgiving feast. Like turkey, it slow-cooks, giving everyone time to chat, mingle, and catch up while being entranced by the incredible aroma wafting from the oven. Once the rib roast is finished, the host, or whoever is awarded the spot at the head of the table, can fulfill the meat-carving ritual as they would have with a turkey. A substantial rib roast provides a lot of food that feeds a lot of people, usually with enough remaining for leftovers (another excellent part of the holiday).

How to Cook It

Cooking prime rib is pretty easy. Season it generously with pepper and larger crystal-sized salt, like kosher salt, and-or your favorite prime rib rub or paste. The experts insist that if you have a top-shelf prime rib roast, one that cuts as easy as tenderloin steak when cooked, a salt and pepper rub alone is both sufficient and recommended. Those same experts suggest bone-in roasts for optimal juiciness, tenderness, and flavor; though bone-in cuts can sometimes be a bit harder to slice.

A conventional prep method for an amazing prime rib is as follows. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Put the prime rib roast in a rack, the fat side up. The rule of thumb for cooking time is 15-20 minutes for every pound of roast. That’s a good guideline, but shouldn’t be used as a definitive timeline. Use a thermometer to more precisely determine doneness. For a rare roast, take it out of the oven when the internal temperature is 110 degrees. A temperature of 120 degrees is medium rare, and 130 degrees is medium.

If those temperatures seem a little low, it’s because the roast is going to be left to rest for at least half an hour, in which time the temperature will rise about 10 degrees. After its half an hour rest, your Thanksgiving prime rib is ready to be served, and a delicious new tradition established.

About Snake River Farms

Producing flavor only 50 years of experience can bring, Snake River Farms has focused on producing the best-tasting beef this country has to offer. Thankfully for both this family-owned business and anyone lucky enough to have tasted the legacy of that commitment, they have succeeded. They’ve accomplished this with a dedication to ensuring the absolute highest standards of quality, sustainable beef-raising, and seeing to the well-being of their animals. Being involved every step of the way, from their standards for raising cattle to their process for creating dry-aged beef, means that every cut is perfection.

Discover the best of what beef can be at Snakeriverfarms.com

Original Source: https://goo.gl/XUzfTx

Why Pre-Seasoning Your Steaks Is a Key to Amazing Flavor

More than any other feature of a menu, the steak can make or break a restaurant’s, and thereby a chef’s, reputation. A lot can be forgiven from a kitchen that delivers an unforgettable rib eye. While stellar sides, service, and setting can be rendered virtually meaningless among the haute cuisine set if the steak is subpar.

 



As important and ubiquitous as steak is as a fine-dining staple, and as crucial as mastery of the season and sear on a good cut of dry-aged beef is for a chef, you’d think the fundamentals of cooking a steak would have been pretty much settled. To some degree they are. For instance, over-seasoning (more than just salt and pepper to a lot of chefs) is virtually universally regarded as a sin on a cut of dry-aged beef, while cooking a steak past (even to) medium can be considered blasphemy.

However, there is a surprisingly basic point of contention that still splits chefs into two passionately opposed camps. Should a steak be seasoned immediately before cooking, or should it be seasoned well in advance? Despite the controversy still raging, the answer isn’t just a subjective matter of taste, so to speak. Pre-seasoning and time-of-cooking seasoning produce demonstrably different results.

The Science of Salting

The foundation of all steak seasoning is, of course, the salt. Salt is also a desiccant, it dries things out, which is why it’s been popular for drying meat to preserve it since prehistory. And that’s the point of the anti-pre-seasoning contingent: that salting that tenderloin steak a day before you cook it isn’t going to make it any more flavorful than in-the-pan seasoning, but it will dry your cut out.

In response, pre-seasoning proponents insist that rubbing a steak down with a modest salt seasoning anywhere from an hour to a day makes for a more thoroughly-seasoned steak. To settle the issue, food-scientist types decided to find out with a series of envy-inspiring experiments.

They found that when the salt first comes into contact with the steak it does draw moisture out by osmosis. That would have ended the debate in favor of the time-of-cooking crowd, except for what happens next. The salt is then dissolved by the moisture it’s drawn out, resulting in a brine solution. The brine begins to break down the steak’s muscle structure, making it more tender and more absorbent. That increasingly absorbent beef then draws that brine right by down into the meat.

The longer you wait, the more thoroughly the salt is distributed throughout the steak, and the more balanced the seasoning profile. Traditionally, chefs and most diners would opt for the more evenly salted cut. That doesn’t mean that there’s nothing to be said for the time-of-cooking seasoners, though. While not as uniformly distributed in the steak, seasoning used right before or during cooking has been seared into the surface as a brine and therefore really pops. That’s why some chefs give their steak a pre-seasoning rub and then very conservatively add some seasoning when it’s in the pan.

Whether you prefer the more even distribution of salt or the tang of a surface-sear, definitely choose one of the two, with an hour at the very least if you’re a pre-seasoner. During the stretch between 55 minutes after seasoning, the salt has drawn the moisture out but the meat hasn’t had time to take it back. Cooking your steak then is cooking away the juices that will make for such a delicious steak.

About Snake River Farms

Producing flavor only 50 years of experience can bring, Snake River Farms has focused on producing the best-tasting beef this country has to offer. Thankfully for both this family-owned business and anyone lucky enough to have tasted the legacy of that commitment, they have succeeded. They’ve accomplished this with a dedication to ensuring the absolute highest standards of quality, sustainable beef-raising, and seeing to the well-being of their animals. Being involved every step of the way, from their standards for raising cattle to their process for crafting the best tenderloin steak, means that every cut is perfection.

Discover the best of what beef can be at Snakeriverfarms.com

Original Source: https://goo.gl/Wfvx1c

Why You’ve Got to Experience Dry-Aged Beef

The dry-aging of beef is a practice with an interesting history. Despite its current incarnation as a usually high-end steakhouse delicacy, its origins are far humbler. It’s unclear how far back dry-aging of beef goes, although the fundamentals of dry-aging, along with its cousins like salting, curing, and smoking, are older than recorded history. Dry-aging specifically is at least centuries old, as Rembrandt painted an ox being dry-aged in 1655.

So why is an ancient process for the aging of meat all the rage from armchair-foodies to Michelin-starred chefs, pros on the barbeque circuit to suburbanites grilling their backyard? Its popularity is the result of what the aging process does to (and for) the beef.


                  


How Does Dry-Aging Work?

Dry-aging beef is pretty much what it sounds like—the right cuts of beef are left to age in the right conditions. The right cuts are pretty much universally agreed to be the ribeye, New York strip, the top butt (sirloin), and the porterhouse. Dry-aging DIY hopefuls should be aware that the process is applied to big slabs of beef from which steaks are cut. Any dry-aging of individual steaks would result in a sad, shriveled hunk of extremely expensive jerky.

The key to producing top-shelf steakhouse-grade dry-aged beef is to keep a well-marbled, liberally fat-rimed hunk of beef in a low-temperature, high-humidity enclosure. A temperature between 33-36 degrees and humidity between 60-80%, with constantly circulating air, is the Goldilocks zone for a good dry-age. Those conditions encourage aging of the meat without allowing it to spoil.

Why Bother Dry-Aging Beef at All?

The short answer is: Dry-aged beef is better than un-aged beef. At least that’s the consensus among the people who buy, sell, butcher, age, cook, and eat higher-end and specialty beef.

There are two distinct reasons for this. First, when beef ages in the right conditions, naturally-occurring enzymes present in the beef begin breaking down the collagen in the meat. Collagen is the protein that binds muscle fibers and is responsible for steak being tough. The breakdown of that collagen makes dry-aged beef extremely tender, more so than non-aged cuts.

Second, while that collagen is breaking down, the beef is naturally dehydrating. Depending on how long the beef ages, it loses between 10-25% of its moisture. That results in the flavor becoming more intense, almost more concentrated. A rough correlation would be a sauce reducing to become thicker and more flavorful.

It’s sometimes asserted that the dry-aging process makes the beef taste “beefier” or “stronger,” but that’s not entirely accurate. That terrific flavor of beef that steak-lovers are looking for is certainly intensified but there’s more to it than that. One of the by-products of dry-aging is the formation of the amino acid glutamate in the maturing beef. And glutamate is a flavor enhancer—so not only is the beef flavor emerging more robustly, enzymatic changes taking place are flavoring the beef as well.

How strong these flavors are in the beef depends on how long it’s aged. About 14 days is considered the minimum length of time for the dry-aging process to result in any substantive increase in tenderness. And about 21 days is considered the point at which the flavor profiles unique to dry-aged beef really begin to emerge. If there’s a dry-aging standard at which the beef is consumed, it tends to be between 21-30 days.

Beef can certainly be aged for longer than that and the flavors will continue to mature and become more complex. Depending on who you ask, the aging process either keeps making the beef better, or it tops out in the month to month-and-a-half range after which the flavor becomes too intense.

Regardless, those who are familiar with dry-aged beef insist that it’s so tender and delicious, it requires no seasoning beyond salt and pepper. And that is reason enough for any fan of a good steak to try a dry-aged cut at least once.

About Snake River Farms

Snake River Farms is a family-owned beef business that has distinguished itself for the 50 years it’s been in operation by oversight and involvement in every step of beef production, from start to finish. That total commitment to the quality of their beef has meant meeting and exceeding the highest standards of quality, sustainability, and ensuring the well-being of their animals. The experience they’ve acquired since their founding in 1968 ensures that your meat is the best quality and the most delicious, whether it’s their tenderloin steak or dry-aged beef.

Experience the best of what beef can be at Snakeriverfarms.com

Original Source: https://goo.gl/afMB8J

Why You Should Cook with Coriander

Coriander is a flavor powerhouse. Its versatility and subtle flavor profile make it an excellent addition to both sweet and savory recipes. If you aren’t using it frequently, it is time to change up your recipes to include this powerful spice with a host of amazing health benefits.

Coriander and cilantro actually come from the same plant, the Coriandrum sativum plant, a member of the parsley family. The leafy greens are cilantro, while the plump, creamy brown seeds (the plant’s dried fruit) are coriander. Although they come from the same plant, the flavor comparison couldn’t be more different. Cilantro is a bold way to add fresh flavor, whereas coriander provides a slight flavor enhancement that blends perfectly with a variety of other flavors, lending complexity to rubs and marinades. Coriander adds a subtle complexity to tenderloin steak and enhances the natural flavors of the meat.

The History of Coriander

Native to the Mediterranean and the Middle East, Coriander has been a sought-after spice for millennia. Seeds have been discovered in ruins dating back to 5000 B.C. The original confetti, the Romans would throw sweetened balls of coriander during festivals and celebrations; the balls would break apart beautifully, spraying seeds upon the crowds.

Health Benefits

Not only does the flavor of coriander enhance a variety of recipes, but it also carries a slew of health benefits. It’s rich in nutrients that are good for your body and are known to aid in digestion, help skin issues, and be beneficial for blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Coriander is rich in dietary fiber and minerals like copper, calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, and magnesium. It also possesses ample amounts of vitamin C and intense anti-inflammatory properties.

Flavor Profile

Coriander offers a multifaceted flavor profile that allows it to subtlety add to both sweet and savory recipes. Whole coriander is known for its floral and citrus notes and tends to be lighter and sweeter. Whereas grinding the coriander seeds brings out the nuttier, more savory flavors of the seed. Due to its versatility, it’s the perfect addition to intricate seasoning blends.

Marries Well With

The flavor of coriander goes extremely well with garlic, lemongrass, parsley, basil, ginger, cinnamon, and paprika. However, coriander has such a mild flavor that it could find its way into many different flavor profiles and shine. Consider using coriander on your next tenderloin steak.

Recipe Suggestion: Tex-Mex Cowboy Rub

Ingredients:

 

  • 2 high-quality, delicious steaks
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 4 tsp dark brown sugar
  • 1 ½ tsp ground coriander
  • 1 ½ tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp cayenne pepper

 

Directions:

Rub room temperature steaks with olive oil. Combine sugar and spices thoroughly in a small bowl. Rub steaks with this mixture. Cook steaks to your desired temperature and enjoy.

For the full recipe and cooking instructions, click the link above or visit www.snakeriverfarm.com/recipes

About Snake River Farms

Snake River Farms is a family-owned beef business committed to total quality, sustainability, and the well-being of their animals. Founded in 1968, Snake River Farms has spent 50 years creating a company that is involved in every step of beef production, from start to finish. Their experience ensures that your meat is the best quality and the most delicious, be it their tenderloin steak or dry-aged beef.

Impress your palate at Snakeriverfarms.com



Original Source: https://goo.gl/Jt2gQD

8 Tips for Achieving the Perfect Steak

There’s nothing quite like biting into an expertly prepared steak. To enjoy the delicious flavors of your favorite cut of meat, follow the following tips.

1. Start with Great Material

Look for a thick steak—not only is a thicker steak much easier to cook, but a thicker cut will also sear beautifully without turning into a hockey puck. If you’re looking for the best, you won’t find it at the supermarket. That’s because the best cuts of meat tend to go to the restaurant industry. If a truly high-quality cut of meat is a high priority, order online and invest in a ribeye or dry-aged beef from Snake River Farms—your mouth will thank you. Plus, it’ll show up right outside your door.

2. Look for Marbling

Marbling is so important to beef that it is the indicator the USDA utilizes to grade meat. Some meat is so marbled that it has to be graded by the Japanese grading system. American Wagyu, for example, produces meat that features gorgeous marbling distributed throughout the meat. It’s this marbling that provides the buttery, melt-in-your-mouth texture that people are obsessed over. The more marbled the steak, the more memorable the taste should be.

3. Cook from Room Temperature

To achieve even cooking throughout your steak, it’s imperative—especially for thick cuts—that you allow the meat to come up to room temperature prior to searing and cooking. When the steak is brought to room temp, the internal temp is allowed to stabilize throughout the meat, which will encourage even cooking.

4. Season It

If you want a gorgeous seared crust, spices are a must. Steak can handle a fair amount of seasoning, especially if it’s a thick cut. Consider what seasonings will further enhance the natural flavors of the meat, such as your tenderloin steak.

5. Use a Hot Surface

Whether you’re using a grill or the stovetop, you should ensure you are cooking your steak over high heat. The easiest way to mimic a steakhouse sear is to use an extremely hot cast iron skillet. You should let the cast iron skillet sit empty on high heat for at least a few minutes. Insider tip: Don’t use olive oil in your cast iron skillet as it has a very low smoking point and will not work well with this method.

6. Sear It

When you sear meat in a very hot pan, it undergoes a type of caramelization process that enhances the meaty aroma and underlying flavors of the beef.

7. Don’t Overcook It

If you have purchased a quality piece of meat, nothing can ruin it faster than overcooking. You should move your steak off of heat once it reaches the internal temperature that you desire—it will continue to cook as it rests.

 

  • Rare steak has an internal temp of 110° F
  • Medium rare has an internal temp of 120°F
  • Medium has an internal temp of 130°F
  • Medium well has an internal temp 140°F

 

8. Let Your Meat Rest

Letting your meat rest allows the juices in the meat to reabsorb. This is because during the cooking process the protein fibers within meat first loosen and then become smaller and firmer the longer it’s cooked. Moisture that previously dwelled within the cellular makeup of the protein is pushed out of those fibers and pools in the center of the steak. As your meat rests, the protein fibers relax again, and the moisture pooled in the middle seeps back into the meat. Preserving this moisture is a critical component to enjoying a tender, juicy piece of meat.

About Snake River Farms

Snake River Farms is a family-owned beef business committed to total quality, sustainability, and the well-being of their animals. Founded in 1968, Snake River Farms has spent 50 years creating a company that is involved in every step of beef production, from start to finish. Their experience ensures that your meat is the best quality and the most delicious. Try their delicious dry-aged beef that produces a more concentrated, rich meat flavor.

Shop Snakeriverfarms.com for steak your mouth will beg for.



Original Source: https://goo.gl/s84rh7

Melt in Your Mouth Dry-Aged Beef from Snake River Farms


The meat at Snake River Farms is world-renowned for its exceptional characteristics. Their dry-aged beef is at the highest pinnacle of quality. Derived from famous Japanese Wagyu bloodlines, this beef then undergoes a controlled and monitored process of dry-aging, bringing out its best qualities. The end result is a full-flavored steak that will wow your palette.


Satisfy your palette at https://www.snakeriverfarms.com/srfdryagedbeef.html

Why Meat Needs Its Rest After Cooking

Biting into a perfectly cooked tenderloin steak is such a pure eating experience. There’s something about honoring the inner carnivore that is immensely satisfying to the palette. This deeply satisfying experience can be diminished if you don’t allow your steak to rest properly before indulging.

 


During the cooking process the protein fibers within meat first loosen and then become smaller and firmer the longer its cooked. During this process, the moisture previously contained within the protein’s cellular makeup is pushed out of the fibers and into the center. When the meat is removed from the source of heat and begins to cool, its protein fibers are able to relax again—allowing the expelled moisture to seep back into the meat and be reabsorbed.

Preserving this moisture is a critical component to enjoying a tender, juicy piece of meat. When you cut into your tenderloin steak without allowing it to rest, the liquid collagen center that should be reabsorbed instead leaks out and all over your plate, this is because you’ve severed the recovering protein strands too early. When you cut into a piece of meat too early, you’re interrupting the meat before it is fully ready.

Not only are the juices reabsorbing, but your meat shouldn’t finish cooking on heat. The other downside to not allowing meat to rest after cooking is there is carryover cooking. According to Thrillist, “with all foods, especially meat, there is carryover cooking. This means that even after you pull your steak from the grill or oven, it will continue to cook. To achieve the perfect desired temperature, pull off your steak a solid five degrees earlier, and it will rest to perfection by the time you cut it.”

If you’re concerned that your steak will cool too quickly while it rests, tent aluminum foil above the steak without letting it touch the steak. This tenting technique will allow the meat to cool more slowly, while still encouraging the protein juices to reabsorb.

This resting process can also work well for dry-aged beef.

About Snake River Farms

Snake River Farms is a family-owned beef business committed to total quality, sustainability, and the well-being of their animals. Founded in 1968, Snake River Farms has spent 50 years creating a company that is involved in every step of beef production, from start to finish. Their experience ensures that your meat is the best quality and most delicious. They feature superb cuts from American Wagyu, Kurobuta pork, dry-aged beef, and Northwest Beef, plus everything you need to display your BBQ prowess.

 

Original Source: https://goo.gl/vGmkjs